Beautifully Obscure

Are we willing to be obscure? To be unseen? Un-Praised? Unnamed? Looked over?

When I read through the exchanges between Queen Esther and Mordecai in Esther 4: 4-16, I tend to focus on the essential verse 13-14 that define the book of Esther.

While these verses definitely deserve to be digested for its richness in theology and meaning. I often overlook a minor detail which I deem to be insignificant when in reality is a key factor in completing God’s purpose in the book of Esther. That factor would be the messenger – Hathach. The king’s eunuch who God used to relay confidential information between Queen Esther and Mordecai. If it wasn’t for the messenger, Queen Esther would not have found out about the new “law” to annihilate the Jews; be encouraged by Mordecai; and be compelled to risk her life to save her people.

While these verses definitely deserve to be digested for its richness in theology and meaning. I often overlook a minor detail which I deem to be insignificant when in reality is a key factor in completing God’s purpose in the book of Esther. That factor would be the messenger – Hathach. The king’s eunuch who God used to relay confidential information between Queen Esther and Mordecai. If it wasn’t for the messenger, Queen Esther would not have found out about the new “law” to annihilate the Jews; be encouraged by Mordecai; and be compelled to risk her life to save her people.

How often have we read these passages and just see Hathach as just another name because he is obscure? Unimportant? However, when we dive further into these passage we can see the significant role Hathach played in saving God’s people.

In the body of Christ. Not everyone can be the head or the hands, eyes, etc. Some of us are to be the toes, to be the liver, a pancreas. Parts of the body that are hidden and unseen yet, if they stop working the entire body fails.

Throughout the Bible, God has used obscure people to achieve very important tasks in His plan. People who were just a name in a passage, some unnamed – yet, without them a particular task would not have been accomplished. Who was the boy with the loaves and fishes? Who was the servant girl that told Naaman to go see Elisha? Who were the men that lowered Paul in a basket in Damascus? We don’t know them by name, yet God used them to accomplish a significant task for the progression of His purpose.

In the body of Christ, some of us are called to be obscure. Not everyone can be the head or the hands, eyes, etc. Some of us are to be the toes, to be the liver, a pancreas. Parts of the body that are hidden and unseen yet, if they stop working the entire body fails.

God also uses obscure places to mold great men and women of faith. Moses’ time in Midian. David’s time hiding in the caves from Saul. Ruth leaving Moab to follow Naomi. Saul on the road to Damascus, just to name a few. At each time, each came out of their obscure places fully enriched and empowered in Christ.

Therefore, I will ask again, are we willing to be obscure? To do God’s work away from the limelight without recognition or praise? Or if God places us in a place of obscurity, would we be patient and humble enough to sit still and glean from God as others seem to pass us by? Humbly waiting until God is done with us.

I pray that we are. As obscurity is God’s chiseling tool. Chiseling in us a perfect servant’s heart. Not caring if we’re the main attraction or the cook; whether we’re prime time or small time. All that matters is that we are part of His fold and honored to have a part to play (small or big) in His great master plan.

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